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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  November 14, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EST

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this is bbc america, and now live from london, "bbc world news." >> hello, i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories. their body language couldn't be warmer, but aung san suu kyi tells obama that myanmar's road to democracy is going through a bumpy patch and more needs to be done. south african police have been accused as operating as a firing squad when they killed 34 striking minors. fighting in syria and iraq
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with new anti-terror laws. >> i think it's very important to defend our country, to make sure we give our police and security services the tools that they need to keep the country safe. and could this be a predator on the prowl? french police continue their tiger hunt in a town near paris. well, they looked very another ease together earlier today when they were pictured. myanmar's opposition leader aung san suu kyi has been speaking about reform, saying that it has hit a bumpy patch. speaking alongside the u.s. president, the head of the pro-democracy party also criticized laws which ban her from running in the 2015 presidential election. president obama said america would continue to support the transition to democracy in
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myanmar, but he admitted there is still work to be done. >> for many, progress does not come fast enough or spread far enough. people need to feel safe in their homes. and not be subject to arbitrary harassment by individuals acting with impunity. people need to be empowered to pursue their dreams. as myanmar approaches important national elections next year, it will be critical to ensure that all of burma's people can participate in shaping the future of their country. >> it is the duty of the government to make all our people feel secure, and it is the duty of our people to learn to live in harmony with one another. if we want democracy, we have to be prepared to live by the principles of democracy. we have to dare to live according to the principles of democracy. i think we'll get there, but it will take us some time. but we will remain fully committed to the principle of
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nonviolence. >> well, myanmar moved from military to civilian rule in 2010, and it's governed by a military-backed civilian administration led by then sein. media restrictions have eased and many political prisoners, including aung san suu kyi, who was kept in confinement for nearly two decades, have been freed. our correspondent said aung san suu kyi believes political reforms have more recently stalled. >> she's extremely frustrated and she certainly feels that the pace of constitutional change, the face of all political change here has really gone to a level which is almost nothing over the last couple of years. but obviously after having spent an hour with president barack obama, she was determined to come out and stress that both the americans and her were pretty much on the same page in terms of policy. there had been some complaints in the weeks running up to this
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that the americans had been overoptimistic in their treatment of myanmar, that they got carried away by this reform process, that they should have been a little bit tougher and kept some of their leverage. but what we saw at that press conference was a lot of very public affection being shown between president obama and aung san suu kyi. they were trying to get the visual message across that they were still very much working together to deliver change here. >> what would aung san suu kyi like specifically from the u.s.? is that clear? >> well, i think what she would like is they would take a slightly tougher approach. i think she will have been saying that to president obama. she feels that they lifted the trade restrictions, the sanctions which they had in place too quickly. there are still a few in place, but for the most part, the americans have lifted those. she would like some of them to
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have been kept in place so that more leverage could be exerted now. effectively, president obama is trying to encourage, he's offering a carrot, if you like, to the burmese, saying we will support you if you go further down this road of reform. the reality about the reform process here is that it's reached a certain point where the army has to start conceding if political reforms are going to concede. at the moment, the army can veto any changes to the constitution. it can control 25% of the seats in parliament automatically. it can stop the clause being changed, which at the moment prevents aung san suu kyi from becoming president. so the reforms could only go so far, if you like, before it started running up against what effectively is the army saying these reforms will not have any impact on the amount of power, the amount of political power that we control here. >> well, president obama is going to be heading to australia, where he'll join leaders of the world's biggest economies for the g20 summit. the two-day meeting will focus
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on promoting global growth, but there are plenty of other international issues likely to be discussed at the event. our correspondent jon donnison is in brisbane. >> primarily the agenda is an economic one and they're talking about raising growth over the next four years by 2%, and in practice, that would apparently mean $2 trillion being added to the world's economy. there's also plans to try and reduce tax evasion to try and get the world's biggest companies paying more tax. but i think, look, there's a lot going on in the world, and this is really a chance for the world's big powers to meet face to face, and that doesn't happen that often and there's plenty to talk about. there is the situation with islamic state in the middle east and the turmoil there, the ebola crisis, and also, of course, the situation and the tension between russia and ukraine. so the economic discussions here, but there's also some of the world's big issues being discussed on the sidelines. >> and jon, is there any
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possibility of a meeting between presidents obama and putin potentially on the sidelines of this summit? >> it isn't scheduled, but it's always a possibility. and in a way, president putin could cut something of a lonely figure here. there are a lot of people in australia who were saying he shouldn't be invited because, of course, prime minister tony abbott has accused russian-backed rebels of shooting down the mh17 plane in which 38 australians were killed as well as almost 300 people in total. so a lot of australians unhappy about that. they will get to meet face to face and have formal talks with president obama, we don't know. we saw them close together at the apec meeting, but we don't know at this stage. in other news today, president obama is hoping to push through a domestic package of reforms that would lift the
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threat of deportation to millions of undocumented u.s. migrants. speaking during his visit to myanmar, he said the issue had been discussed for the last decade at home in the u.s. and had been consistently stalled. but senior republicans in congress say such action would be beyond the president's authority. the afghan president ashraf ghani is visiting pakistan for the first time since taking office. he is expected to seek pakistan's help in pursuing peace talks with the taliban. in the past, afghanistan has accused pakistan of giving taliban fighters safe havens, although pakistan recently launched high-profile aufs against militants in the areas. in hawaii, lava continues to flow from the kilauea volcano, engulfing the land around the village of pahoa. it's destroyed a house and is threatening the village's recycling center. south african police have been accused of operating as a
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firing squad when they killed 34 striking workers at the mine two years ago. lawyers say officers had engaged in a deliberate attempt to mislead the investigation. from south africa, andrew harding reports. >> reporter: south africa's police continue to insist that this was self-defense. that they were responding to an attack by armed and violent workers at the mericana platman mine. but evidence tells a very different story. that how the police cornered the men, then shot to kill. 34 miners died that day. the man in the green was hit eight times. so you came around this corner and the police were lined up there? he tells me the striking miners
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were trying to return to their homes nearby. but they closed us in, there was no way out, he says, then they started shooting us. but the cease-fire didn't last long. minutes later, the south african police began hunting for other miners who were hiding here and shooting them. the commissioners heard that the police planted weapons beside their dead bodies. despite that, the police insist that they were acting purely in self-defense. >> there is no evidence that suggests that that line has been reached. >> reporter: the government insists it didn't order the police to act with such lethal force. but the commission's independent legal advisers have reached their own devastating conclusions, accusing the police of acting like a paramilitary firing squad, annihilating the
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enemy. the man who once defended nelson mandela in court says no one in democratic south africa should be above the law. >> that it should actually charge with murder the people that advised the plan. the police officers who gave them the okay to do it. and also the people that did the shooting. >> reporter: meanwhile, the mine is working again. the police are waiting to hear the commission's final report. and two years on, survivors believe justice may never come. andrew harding, bbc news, south africa. let's catch up with what's going on in the eurozone. it's not good, is it, really? >> it's not good. we had some slightly better than expected numbers, but it is pretty dismal. just seems eurozone can't get out of its endemic stagnation.
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today a year on from the eurozone's longest ever economic slump. official figures have confirmed that bare recovery, barely happening at all. let me show you some of these number. between july and september, the eurozone's economy grew just this, 0.2%. a little higher than the 0.1% tick that was recorded in the second quarter of this year. that previous three-month period. and actually most experts were expecting that 0.1, but we got 0.2. individual figures for germany tell a similar story. that's all germany grew. confirmed at just 0.1%. france fared a little better. this was a bit of a surprise. 0.3. remember, france hasn't grown at all this year until that number there. italy, though, not so lucky. italy again took another step backwards. 0.1%. italy has now failed to -- listen to this. italy has now failed to grow for 13 quarters. that is no growth at all in
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italy for 39 months. we know the european central bank has slashed borrowing costs to record lows and it's launched multiple programs to encourage banks to lend. but should governments be doing more, focusing on investment rather than austerity? spending rather than cutting? that's the question we'll be asking a lot of experts today, but certainly coming up on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. how about this one? twitter's debt has been downgraded by the rating agency s&p 500. expecting higher user growth, but the downgrade has worried investors and certainly hit twitter's share price. the microblogging stock, which has 264 million regular users still does not make a profit. twitter, no profit. lots going on. follow me on twitter. you can tweet me, i'll tweet you right back. all the rest coming up on "gmt." >> thanks very much indeed. stay with us here on "bbc world news."
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much more to come. what are the strange sounds coming e ining from this comet? an astrophysicist gives us the answers. ness. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards.
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for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines for you. myanmar's opposition leader aung san suu kyi says she's confident the united states will continue to support democratic reforms in her country. south african police have been accused of operating as a firing squad when they killed 34 striking miners two years ago. now, british nationals who travel to syria and iraq to join extremist groups could be prevented from returning home. that's under plans announced by the british prime minister david cameron, who's in australia for
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the g20 summit. he's been speaking to the country's parliament. >> we will shortly be introducing our own new counterterrorism bill in the united kingdom. new powers for the police at ports to seize passports, to stop suspects traveling, and to stop british nationals returning to the uk unless they do so on our terms. new rules to prevent airlines that don't comply with our no-fly lists or our security screening measures from landing in the uk. >> i'm joined now by margaret gilmore, who analyzes uk national security at the royal united services institute. margaret, good to see you. what do you make, first of all, of the announcement we've heard? >> i think it will make it easier to monitor who's coming back into the country if they've been fighting in places like syria. i also think it should make it easier for people who have been out to fight, who have been extremists, but who want to move on, who want to move back into looking at mainstream
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interpretations of islam, who want to move back with their families, to engage and to get help in moving back into life as they had before. and they will be asked to get involved in counterradicalization programs and to start having conversations about all of that, and i think it will be easier for them to do that. so i think that's a good thing, but i think there are some negatives on seizing passports as people go out. >> why is that a problem? >> well, the home secretary already has the power to do that, and there are a lot of checks and balances. and i think those powers are probably enough. it worries me that by widening the powers, the police have this power, they can do it more easily, more quickly, and therefore it widens the scope for the wrong people to be stopped. it would be awful if a student who wanted to go to some interesting places like turkey or jerusalem found that they couldn't actually get out of the country. >> that would not happen
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presumably without some intelligence anyway, because so many people travel, don't they? >> so many people travel anyway, but the fact that the checks and balances we have in place at the moment are going to be put aside and sort of loosened, if you like, just opens the gap so that it will be just a little bit more likely that occasionally somebody will slip through who shouldn't be stopped. >> isn't it a bigger worry, though, that actually if you are coming back from fighting in syria and iraq, you're not going to come back through the traditional routes and therefore actually the borders, they're not going to know that you've come back from those areas? >> i think in a lot of cases, the intelligence agencies do know the names. a lot of these people who are fighting boast about it on the internet. they are communicating with known networks in the uk, with known groups. a lot of the names are already known that are already on a list, so if they come back in from whatever route, they are likely to be stopped and told you come back in on these conditions. i think there are discussions to
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be had over what those conditions are. the fact that they are now going to have to come back on condition they face arrest, they face being stopped, and they face being, you know, at the very least monmonitored. >> thanks very much indeed, margaret. now we move on to something very strange. a big cat believed to be a stray tiger is on the loose near paris. it seems to have moved closer to the city. this is the still photograph of it caught against the skyline near the town of montevrain. local media reporting that a huntsman has found paw prints at a service station 26 kilometers east of paris. it's not clear where the animal has come from. i was told more about what is known about this mysterious feline. >> it is a tiger. a lot of these reports turn out to be hoaxes or blurry photographs of very, very big tom cats, but they are convinced that this is a real wild animal, a real animal from -- not native to france that's been brought in
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for some reason or another. and interestingly, french television has been showing paw prints of the animal because it's very wet and muddy at the moment and it's been leaving paw prints all over the place. and they are these great big padded prints, suggesting a big feline, and the experts have looked at them and said no, this is probably a tiger, probably an animal of about a year, year and a half. a youngish animal, but still big enough to do you damage. it's somewhere around this area, which is really in the suburbs of paris. it's about 20 miles east of where i am now, where sort of the paris tapers out and becomes countryside. very near disneyland paris for that matter. it was spotted yesterday near a supermarket. the latest is that there's been another sighting early this morning about ten kilometers -- about seven miles away from that near a motorway that comes in from eastern france into paris near a service station, and again, there are paw prints there. so it's clearly moving around.
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there's once again a big hunt operation under way right this minute to try and find it. >> do we know how far it can travel and how fast? >> well, if it covered -- if these two sightings were genuine, then overnight it moved ten miles or so. i don't think that's extraordinary. so all around that area, people are kind of on alert. but police are saying that's probably not too much to be worried about. it's probably a young animal and probably it's used to humans. it's probably an exotic pet that has been let loose, in which case it's used to humans and need not necessarily be regarded as a big threat. nonetheless, obviously, any big animal can hurt and kill, and so they're out there with guns and tranquilizer guns as well. european space scientists monitoring the philae probe say
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the time has come to take more risks. the probe is now stable and sending pictures, but its landing position means it's not getting enough sunlight to work. and it might be entering its last day of usable power. a little earlier, i spoke to the astrophysicist tim o'brien about the data they've managed to get so far. >> just amazing photographs, amazing science that's coming back from the instruments onboard the lander. i mean, it's one of the most incredible space missions i've ever seen. so, you know, 316 million miles away and we've landed a spacecraft on a comet and we're finding out what that comet is made of and maybe even how it might have contributed to the development of life on earth. what an amazing success. >> and we've heard some extraordinary sounds as well. let's just have a quick listen if we can. and can you explain what these bleeps are?
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>> yeah. it's actually -- it's the sound of the magnetic field of the comet, so this comet has a little residual magnetic field left over from when the comet was made nearly 5 billion years ago. those are bisically caused by we think particles from the comet and particles from the sun traveling through the magnetic field of the comet. rather than watching a wiggly line, that's been turned into sound for us to hear it. >> i gather you've got a model with you. >> i have. >> does that slightly explain for us the difficulty? because the lander is stable, but it's not necessarily in the right place, and its shelf life might be limited. >> yeah, this is a 3-d printed model of the koemcomet, lacks a like a rubber duck. the lander was supposed to land and in fact did first hit the comet right on the top. and then it bounced about a kilometer up in the air and came to rest we think somewhere over
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here. sort of near the wall of this depression that you might be able to see there in the head of this rubber duck comet. and because of that, it's sitting in shadow, which means that they're not able to use the solar panels to charge up the extra batteries, so we're running on the original battery charge, which was about 60 hours. that's going to run out sometime tomorrow, we think. and so we're now in this stage where we've done all the science that's not risky in terms of perhaps dislodging this lander and putting it in an even worse position. and now we're going to try i think later today drilling into the comet, to sort of measure what the comet itself is made of. but that drilling process might actually tilt the lander. might put it in a better position. so that would be fingers crossed for that, but that's what's going to happen later today. >> professor tim o'brien. we wish them luck. we're just going to leave you with these pictures from brisbane, because president
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putin has just flown in. his plane has just landed. you see it there on the tarmac. going to be interesting to see the reception that he gets. of course, things very tense between europe, u.s., and moscow. we're just hearing, though, that there is going to be a separate meeting with angela merkel and mr. putin on the sidelines. we're back in five minutes. join us. with two times the meat than other leading brands. it helps keep him strong from tiara to toenail. just one of many iams formulas to keep love strong. oh no. who are you? daddy, this is blair, he booked this room with priceline express deals and saved a ton. i got everything i wanted. i always do. he seemed nice. you know how fast you were going? about 55. where you headed at such an appropriate speed? across the country to enhance the nation's most reliable 4g lte network. how's it working for ya? better than ever. how'd you do it? added cell sites. increased capacity.
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories. their body language couldn't be warmer, but aung san suu kyi tells president obama myanmar's road to democracy is going through a bumpy patch, and more needs to be done. britain's prime minister vows to tackle british extremists fighting in syria and iraq with new anti-terror laws. >> i think it's very important to defend our country, to make sure we give our police and security services the tools that they need to keep the country safe.
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the sound of space. scientists create this sound track from the comet at the heart of the rosetta mission. and could this be the most pointless work of art ever seen? we'll meet the artist who's looking for a needle in a haystack. well, they looked very at ease together earlier today, but myanmar's opposition leader aung san suu kyi is saying that reform in her country has hit a bit of a bumpy patch, as she was speaking alongside the u.s. president at her home. the head of the pro-democracy party also criticized government laws which ban her from running in the 2015 presidential election. mr. obama said america would continue to support the transition to democracy in
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myanmar, but he's admitted there is still work to be done. >> for many, progress does not come fast enough or spread far enough. people need to feel safe in their homes. and not be subject to arbitrary harassment by individuals acting with impunity. people need to be empowered to pursue their dreams. and as myanmar approaches important national elections, it will be important to ensure that all of burma's people can participate in shaping the future of their country. >> it is the duty of the government to make all our people feel secure, and it is the duty of our people to learn to live in harmony with one another. if we want democracy, we have to be prepared to live by the principles of democracy. we have to dare to live according to the principles of democracy. i think we'll get there, but it will take us some time. but we will remain fully committed to the principle of
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nonviolence. >> well, myanmar moved from military to civilian rule in 2010. and it's governed by a military-backed civilian administration led by thien sien who met president obama on thursday. under his leadership, media restrictions have eased and many political prisoners, including aung san suu kyi, who was kept in confinement for nearly two decades, have now been freed. our correspondent jonah fisher said however that aung san suu kyi still believes that political reforms have now stalled. >> reporter: she's extremely frustrated, and she certainly feels that the pace of constitutional change, the pace of all political change here has really gone to a level which is almost nothing over the last couple of years, but obviously after having spent an hour with president barack obama, she was determined to come out and stress that both the americans and her were pretty much on the same page in terms of policy. there had been some complaints
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in the weeks running up to this that the americans had been overoptimistic in their treatment of myanmar, that they got carried away by this reform process, that they should have been a little bit tougher and kept some of their leverage. but what we saw at that press conference was a lot of very public affection being shown between president obama and ms. suu kyi. they hugged, they kissed, they walked off arm in arm. they were clearly trying to get the very visual message across that they were still working very much together to deliver change here. >> what would aung san suu kyi like specifically from the u.s.? is that clear? >> reporter: well, i think what she would like is that they would take a slightly tougher approach, and i think she will have been saying that to president obama. she feels that they lifted the trade restrictions, the sanctions which they had in place too quickly. there are still a few in place, but for the most part, the americans have lifted those
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measures. she would like some of them to have been kept in place so that more leverage could be exerted. effectively, president obama is trying to encourage -- he's offering a carrot, if you like, to the burmese saying we will work with you, we will support you if you go further down this road of reform. but the reality about the reform process here is that it's reached a certain point where the army has to start conceding if political reforms are going to concede. at the moment, the army can veto any changes to the constitution, it can control 25% of the seats in parliament automatically. it can stop the clause being changed, which at the moment prevents aung san suu kyi from becoming president. so the reforms could only go so far, if you like, before it's started running up against what effectively is the army saying these reforms will not have any impact on the amount of power, the amount of political power that we control here. >> jonah fisher there. european space scientists monitoring the progress of the philae probe say the time has come to take more risks, after its bumping landing, the probe
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is now stable and it is sending back pictures, but its landing position means it's not getting enough sunlight to work and it might just be entering its last day of usable power. so, how does this whole rosetta project compare to say the trips to the moon? here are the thoughts of the second human ever to set foot on the lunar surface, buzz aldrin. >> landing on the moon, we had humans in control of the spacecraft, and the european space agency control center was 30 minutes one way communication, so everything had to be done automatically with communication updates, realizing that it would take an hour before a command could be executed. so an awful lot had to be put
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together so that this lander could essentially do things on its own while they were being observed and commanded to start, and a few changes from earth. but it's very remarkable. >> buzz aldrin there. the second man to step foot on the moon. now back down to earth, and britain's prime minister has spoken of tough anti-terror measures for jihadists who travel abroad to fight. david cameron's plans include jail time and seizing the passports of fighters returned to the uk from iraq and syria. but one country, denmark, has other ideas. his focus isn't on imprisonment, but on deradicalizing fighters who return to the country. duncan crawford reports. >> reporter: european jihadis in a propaganda video in syria.
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how should the rest deal with radicalized fighters if they return home? many governments have promised tough action, including jail time. but denmark has a different approach. this 21-year-old doesn't want to be identified. he fought with islamist militants in syria last year before coming back to the danish city of allhurst. >> i was involved in fighting, yes. my main position was to -- was with the heavy artillery. >> so you know how to fire heavy artillery and try to shoot a plane out of the sky? >> yes. it's not a big thing to learn, but you need to practice to be a better shooter. >> reporter: he supports a danish deradicalization program aimed at helping around a dozen young jihadis. instead of jailing them, denmark is offering support. >> they want you to come back to be a part of society again. and i believe that's the right way to handle these youth who are coming back from syria.
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>> reporter: this mosque was previously accused of encouraging people to travel to syria. now the police and social workers are working with religious leaders to check former fighters don't pose a risk. >> we try to advise our young and the people who have been in syria that they have to live a normal life when they come back. >> reporter: the dangers of working with jihadis are all too clear. in this propaganda video in syria, they use pictures of danish politicians as targets. police say anyone who returns to denmark and is believed to have broken the law could face prosecution, but so far, no one has. the mayor of allhurst says their methods work. >> we need to make sure that they are deradicalized and that we are following them very, very closely in their everyday life, giving them opportunities to get education, to get a job, and to
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be an active part of society. >> reporter: some in denmark are concerned about the risks. this returning fighter insists they're not a threat. >> a lot of muslim fighters in syria. i know what i'm talking butt io become a threat to their own countries. >> reporter: should those who return from the battlefield be in prison or given help? the danish solution is unique. but for all countries, their chief concern is to stop the war in syria from arriving on the streets of europe. duncan crawford, bbc news, aarhus. more now on the specific plans here in britain. david cameron has outlined his ideas for tough new anti-terror laws in the uk. speaking to the australian parliament ahead of the g20 summit there, he said that
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suspected extremists who had left to join militant groups could face being excluded from the uk for up to two years. anyone who did return would be subject to stricter monitoring. mr. cameron also said he wanted the police to be able to confiscate a suspect's passport as they tried to leave britain. >> we will shortly be introducing our own new counterterrorism bill in the united kingdom. new powers for the police at ports to seize passports, to stop suspects traveling, and to stop british nationals returning to the uk unless they do so on our terms. new rules to prevent airlines that don't comply with our no-fly lists or our security screening measures from landing in the uk. >> well, mr. cameron also said internet providers have agreed to strengthen filters to stop people from viewing extremist material. what do you make of these proposals? >> i noticed that the prime minister also said by way of
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introduction that he wanted to promote the rule of law, and that british citizens needed to sign up to the rule of law. i don't think you promote the rule of law by dumping yur citizens like toxic waste on the international community. unless they will accept coming back to the uk to face punishment without trial. the rule of law -- >> isn't the point of this to try and stop young people as they're seeing leaving? i heard from one person that they think it's about five a week, and if they know that they can't return home ultimately, that could be a deterrent. if they want to come back, they can hand themselves in. >> i think injustice fuels the desire to go off and fight. i don't think it prevents it. and that has been my experience of these tough speeches. >> why is this unjust? why do you think this is unjust? >> why is this unjust to exclude your citizens from returning home unless they are prepared to agree to punishment without
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trial? why is that unjust? it's unjust because it doesn't involve charges, evidence, and proof before you are punished. >> well, it does have to go through -- >> either by being rendered stateless or by having to face punishment in the community without trial. >> it will have to go through some sort of judicial process, presumably. and there will have to be some sort of evidence. >> that's not what is being proposed. i'm sorry, but maybe i've misread the speech. but what i understand to be proposed is that people coming back will be told they cannot return unless they accept a tea pin, which is a rebranded control order, which means close supervision in the community. like a community punishment order, but without criminal charges or a trial. >> but if people are found to -- i mean, this is only going to happen if security agencies, if the intelligence agencies have got evidence presumably of some sort of militant activity. are you really saying that the
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authorities should allow those people back into this country, where we know that they then pose a risk to the british public? >> well, we don't know. that's why we've had centuries of fair trials in the uk. would you like to face punishment without trial? that's my question. on the basis of secret intelligence alone? that is a way to recruit jihadis, not to prevent them. >> aren't you justifying people going out there? they will just use your argument to say this is another reason for us to leave the country and you're promoting individual liberties of these people over the security of the public. >> no, i'm not. i'm promoting centuries of democratic values that we say distinguish us from tyrants like isil. that's what i'm doing. >> well, the fact is that the world is changing hugely, and surely laws, do mes ukly and internationally, have to change to keep up with that. >> is that the fak ct or a
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journalistic question that you're asking me? >> i'm asking you. >> i believe in fundamental human rights, as what it is we offer our people and the world as opposed to what is being offered by isil. that's the difference. and that's the difference we need to promote. >> thanks very much indeed. now we're just going to show you some pictures, because in brisbane at the g20 summit gets under way, the russian president vladimir putin has just touched down for the weekend summit. earlier, mr. putin said that western sanctions against russia are against the principles of the g20, the world trade organization and international law. in an interview with a russian state news agency task, mr. putin admitted the sanctions imposed on russia over its actions in ukraine were damaging russia, but said they harmed america, too. he said they also threatened 300,000 jobs in germany. along with falling oil price, sanctions are putting increasing pressure on russia's economy. the russian currency, the ruble,
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has lost nearly a quarter of its value in the past three months. some news we've just had in in the last few moments here. indian police have arrested the head of a drug manufacturing company and his son on suspicion of destroying evidence related to the deaths of 13 women who had sterilizations. more victims arrived at hospitals from villages on thursday and friday, complaining of vomiting, dizziness and swelling. the drugs company says it's done nothing wrong. the doctor who performed the procedures has also been arrested. he insists that his operations are not to blame for the women's deaths. stay with us here on "bbc world news." much more to come. a city map unlike any other. we'll reveal how big data can help guide us around the urban maze.
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welcome to "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with today's headlines. aung san suu kyi says she's confident the united states will continue to support democratic reforms in her country. britain's prime minister vows to tackle british extremists fighting in syria and iraq with new anti-terror laws. now, let's get the very latest on the rosetta mission. there's not very much time left, is there, to sort this out. melissa is with us, our science reporter. what are they going to do, try and drill to make an escape? >> indeed. it's crunch time for rosetta. they have to deploy one of their main drills to get material from the comet, analyze it, because that's really what the whole mission was about. they want to get the material, essentially heat it up like a microwave oven, get the vapors and analyze the chemical c
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composition, and they have to do it now because time is running out. the bottomries will stop working if it doesn't get any more sunlight. >> and what can they do in terms of moving it, and what happens if it doesn't move? r >> that's the problem. they don't really know where it landed. they hope to deploy the drill, but the drill might move it. they need to wait for the signal to come back, tell us where it is. but if they don't drill, they won't get any crucial data that they want. they have deployed a tiny drill which drills one centimeter into the surface to analyze temperature data and the outside material of the comet. and that might have moved itself, and apparently the data is coming in as we speak. >> and we're also hearing some very intriguing sounds. let's play a couple for you. what is that? >> it's lovely, isn't it?
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it's a singing come et. it's been trending on twitter. you wouldn't be able to hear that if you ever made it that far to space. it's essentially sped up oscillations of radiation from when the comet was first created. >> okay. melissa, thanks very much indeed for joining us. we're on hitenterhooks trying t see what happens. our website has a full assessment of all the developments so far. i have tweeted a link to that game, you can play it yourself. when we think of maps here on the ground, we usually think of roads or railway stations on them, too. but the huge amount of data available means we can now take a whole new way of looking at our cities, and that's just what two writers have done for london in this book. it's called the information capital. we have a graphic showing the
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analysis of photo shared on websites to identify the most popular spots in london. the yellow dots that you can see there share images snapped in the daytime. you can see how popular buckingham palace are, the houses of parliament are, and the purple indicates nighttime snaps apparently, as people drift towards the night life areas of soho. i think we need a few names on there just to show us exactly where this is. this shows the speed at which the average cost of renting two-bedroom flats is going up, because dark red shows the steepest rise. light gray shows where prices have gone down. all the different color dots show supports for where london's various football teams is. the strongest appears to be a toss-up between arsenal and chelsea, the reds and blues for the title of best-supported club. if you've ever wondered where single people live here in london, you're most likely to find one in a lively central
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area. but once londoners get married, as you can see from the changing location of the pink shaded areas, it's out to the suburbs they go. let's speak to one of the men behind these maps, an expert on advanced spatial analysis at university college of london. today he's live for us. it's absolutely fascinating to look at some of those maps. how have you gathered all this information? >> well, london is a great place, really, because it generates a lot of its own data. but also it makes it freely available for people to use. so we've been able to use 3-d data downloadable from the greater london authority website. we've been able to use data that come from the national census in the uk. and we're able to come bin all this stuff together and cram 19.5 million data points into that book. >> i gather you've got one book that shows where the happiest
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and most sad people are here in london? >> yes, that's right. happiness and general well-being is a new thing that people have started moving towards to look at life satisfaction beyond standard measures of how much money people are earning and so on. so the office for national statistics have started trying out questions about how happy you are, how fulfilled you are, how satisfied you are in your life. unfortunately, issington comes out last, where is where i live. >> i'm not going to tell you where i live, but i would love to know where it comes on the map. could they do this in new york or sydney? >> lots of cities around the world have got bits of data that could be used. so new york, for example, has some very good taxi data. it has some very good transport data that we could use. but a few places have the same composition of data, like the national census. ours is one of the most detailed in the world, combined with the fact that londoners love to
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tweet and engage with technology, and then combined with the fact that we have transport for london, who offer all these data sets for us to look at and create these beautiful visuals. >> we will have to leave it there. thanks very much indeed and good luck with your research. i think it's beginning to be very popular. now, you might think that looking for a needle in a haystack is a pointless task, but one italian artist is setting out to prove that it's not the case. he is working his way through a pile of straw in a gallery in paris and says he won't stop until he's succeeded. >> reporter: not many museum directors get quite this close to the works on display, but if you're going to hunt the need until the haystack, first someone has to hide it. and now the performance proper can again. painstaking, laborious, but for the artist, clearly something of an obsession. >> it's a current figure of speech.
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since i was a child, when i heard it the first time, i think it was in primary school, and i just always thought how is this actually beginning to be if i really do it. >> the technique seem to be to grab a handful of stalks and hoping in vain for a prick. i could tell him roughly where the needle is, but i won't because that would rather miss the point. he's on a personal artistic mission. the suspense. will he or won't he find it is part of the act. and for his next taking common phrase literally stunt, how about making a mountain out of a molehill. now that would be something. we've just heard some breaking news on the africa nations cup. the football cup. morocco was due to be hosting that cup in january. it has declined, and it is moving instead to equatorial
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guinea. so equatorial guinea beginning to be hosting that tournament next year. just waiting to hear whether that's also going to be going ahead in january. the reason for morocco was because of ebola. they did not want to import fans or anyone else who might risk spreading ebola, but equatorial guinea have agreed. more on that throughout the day on bbc news. bye-bye. what if we finally had a back yard? that would be amazing. hey, what if we took down this wall? what if this was my art studio? what if we were pre-approved? shut up! from finding to financing, how'd you do that? zillow.
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hello, and welcome to "gmt" on "bbc world news." i'm stephen sackur. our top stories, president obama delivers a blunt message to the government in myanmar. more reform needed and fast. the u.s. president makes a house call on opposition leader aung san suu kyi and says the ban on her running for president doesn't make sense. >> ultimately, what changes are made are up to the people of burma. but for example, i don't understand a
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